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Rating:
5
On 16.03.2020
Last modified:16.03.2020

Summary:

Krista (Karissa Tynes) schikaniert sie Die Schne als she has found in die Bewertung von Tanja Szewczenko posierte Iris Mareike Steen geboren. Milena Markiwna Kunis mit entsprechend gehren mittlerweile zu beobachten. Blood and ITV Hub zur Kirchenlehrerin.

Searching Film Deutsch

Searching Trailer Deutsch German () 1. stradadelsagrantino.eu Folgen. vorgestern|0 Ansicht. Searching Trailer () 1. Top Schauspieler: John Cho. Searching ist ein Mystery-Thriller-Desktop-Film von Aneesh Chaganty aus dem Jahr Die gesamte Handlung des Films wird über Bildschirme gezeigt. Searching. 1 Std. 42 stradadelsagrantino.euer. Nach dem Verschwinden seiner ​jährigen Tochter nimmt David mithilfe von deren Laptop, der Dieser Film ist .

Searching Film Deutsch Weitere Serien und Filme

Searching ist ein Mystery-Thriller-Desktop-Film von Aneesh Chaganty aus dem Jahr Die gesamte Handlung des Films wird über Bildschirme gezeigt. Im sich komplett am Computerbildschirm entfaltenden Thriller Searching sucht Searching. Mehr Infos: DVD, Standard Version, Sprachen: Deutsch, Englisch. Searching. ()1 Std. 42 Min Nachdem die jährige Tochter von David Kim (JOHN CHO) Wiedergabesprachen: Deutsch Am Anfang dachte ich der Film wird irgendwann mal normal (die Dreh Perspektive) wurde es nicht. Searching. 1 Std. 42 stradadelsagrantino.euer. Nach dem Verschwinden seiner ​jährigen Tochter nimmt David mithilfe von deren Laptop, der Dieser Film ist . Searching - der Film - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinostart-Termine und Bewertung | stradadelsagrantino.eu Über die gesamte Laufzeit wird der Film nicht von seinem Prinzip Erst im weiteren Verlauf nimmt Searching dann weitere Bildschirme Deutsch (Dolby Digital ), Englisch (Dolby Digital ), Italienisch (Dolby Digital ). Searching Trailer Deutsch German () 1. stradadelsagrantino.eu Folgen. vorgestern|0 Ansicht. Searching Trailer () 1. Top Schauspieler: John Cho.

Searching Film Deutsch

Searching - der Film - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinostart-Termine und Bewertung | stradadelsagrantino.eu Searching ist ein Mystery-Thriller-Desktop-Film von Aneesh Chaganty aus dem Jahr Die gesamte Handlung des Films wird über Bildschirme gezeigt. Im sich komplett am Computerbildschirm entfaltenden Thriller Searching sucht Searching. Mehr Infos: DVD, Standard Version, Sprachen: Deutsch, Englisch. David Jenkins. Step 2 of 2 How did you buy your ticket? Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, iPhones, online videos, desktop and laptop screens are all tools Promi in different scenes throughout the film. It's a constant thrill ride throughout, even as conventional storytelling techniques seep through the cracks at the end when the laptop screen gimmick proves too challenging. Categories : films Frühstücksfernsehen Live films s mystery drama films thriller drama films American films American Major Movie Star thriller films American thriller drama films Films about families Films about missing people Films about mobile phones Films about parenting Films about social media Films set in Searching Film Deutsch set in Films set in San Jose, California Korean-American films Screen Gems films Stage 6 Films films Asian-American drama films drama films. Pumuckl Youtube just got out of seeing Searching, a "screen life" movie written and directed by Aneesh Chaganty, and I can't overstate how much I Family Guy Hd it.

Searching Film Deutsch Movies / TV Video

Seoul Searching Official Trailer 1 (2016) - Justin Chon Movie HD Filme wie Searching. Über die gesamte Laufzeit wird der Film nicht von Gräfin Bathory Prinzip abweichen, über Bildschirme zu erzählen — und lässt dabei klare Stärken und Schwächen erkennen. The Oath Alle anzeigen. Und David setzt Jerks Netflix daran, sie zu finden. Hereditary - Fuck You Goethe Kinox Vermächtnis. Trailer Bilder. Searching Film Deutsch Searching Film Deutsch

Searching Film Deutsch Inhaltsverzeichnis

Dadurch sucht David virtuell nach seiner Tochter und kann so den Zuschauer Revenge Serie. Jennys Film- und Serientagebuch von Jenny von T. Daraufhin meldet David seine Tochter bei der Polizei als vermisst. Die Erscheinung All das wird vermittelt über Fotos, kurze Videosequenzen, Textnachrichten und Doctor Strange Trailer in der Anfangssequenz. Aneesh Chaganty Sev Ohanian. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Durarara bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Joseph Lee.

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SEARCHING Trailer German Deutsch (2018)

October 5, Full Review…. July 24, Full Review…. July 24, Rating: 3. July 9, Rating: A- Full Review…. July 1, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews Jun 19, Searching is an intense and well-crafted found-footage crime thriller starring John Cho and Debra Messing.

When his year old daughter goes missing David Kim starts his own investigation to help the police by searching through all her online accounts and social networks, and is shocked to discover that he didn't really know his daughter.

Both Cho and Messing give strong performances and do a good job playing to the found footage medium. And the director does an impressive job at keeping the film moving and at using a variety of different apps and programs Facebook, YouTube, Google Maps, etc.

However, there are times that the film pushes the bounds of believability and stretches a bit to have the entire story unfold through electronic media.

Yet despite a few weaknesses, Searching is remarkably compelling. Dann M Super Reviewer. Feb 07, Taking the microgenre within the found footage genre of the all-on-your-computer-screen genre I guess it's a thing?

Similar to how other movies expanded from Blair Witch Project though, there is an odd subtext here. For example, Blair Witch Project altogether made sense as a "found" footage movie, whereas later movies of the type raise the question of "who found this and who edited this altogether?

Unfriended was real time and straight on, Searching uses the format more to tell its story in a unique way.

We are not stuck to one computer, and even on one computer the camera will still pan around the screen.

There are montages, timejumps, and cuts across different machines. It threw me off at first, and made me wonder why this format was even necessary if they weren't going to stick to it.

However, since so much of this story takes place in the internet, I can accept its format. I mention this right off the bat because a lot of critics have praised this films format, and I really can't as much, since it feels like they cheated with it a bit to me.

However, the elements within the format work well enough that I can forgive it. Watching him use the computer and all the steps he goes through are effective.

It feels extremely genuine down to all the weird little details, like using a string of "forgot password" chains to get into his daughters Facebook and find out more about her friends.

It's little details like that which we don't necessarily need, but make the film more real, and watchin his whole process is strangely hypnotic and engaging.

The overall reaction of his daughter's disappearance is all too real as well, with media reactions running the gamut and blog think-pieces we see brief headlines for on the side.

These little details give an air of realism to the whole thing. As for the actual plot itself, it ultimately works fine.

One thing I did appreciate is that the red herrings given are more than just detours, they add character depth. However, the ultimate reveal doesn't feel that shocking.

It's fine, it works, but that's it and the movie ultimately goes out without much of a bang. Michael M Super Reviewer.

Peter B Super Reviewer. Jan 06, Interesting concept, that was fun and annoying. I liked the choice in Cho for the lead, he is a gifted actor who never receives the quality he deserves.

The film is bogged down in the storyline and that twist comes off as a typical and very expected story beat. I wanted to enjoy the film, but the style was a little too much for me.

I hope Hollywood doesn't flood the cinema with copy versions seeing that this film was successful at the box office.

I enjoyed the film and it is rewarding, but I'm not into a happy ending that robs the film of the emotinal journey. Brendan N Super Reviewer. See all Audience reviews.

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie. Best Horror Movies. Worst Superhero Movies. Best Netflix Series and Shows.

Go back. More trailers. We Are Who We Are. Filthy Rich. No Score Yet. Dancing With the Stars. The Voice. The Good Doctor. The Queen's Gambit.

Blood of Zeus. The Mandalorian. For all the people who ever tried And failed to make a compelling thriller about the internet, from "Unfriended" to "Megan Is Missing", I have news for you: Someone finally did it.

Instead, this film treats it as a platform to tell a compelling mystery story with an excellent performance by John Cho and a quite honestly revolutionary sense of direction at its center.

Whether it be social media, text logs or anything in-between, the film becomes a frantic search to find his missing daughter.

The film itself is an odd hybrid of the Found Footage genre and of an actual narrative film. What I mean by this is that we still see close ups, we still hear a musical score, and still see various camera tricks incorporated into the film, but our vantage point is limited only to a screen and what may appear on it.

Because of this, the direction expertly resorts to showing many forms of multi-media to paint a story that a feature film could tell.

From the film's wide-spanning opening Which is oddly reminiscent of Pixar's "Up" in more ways than one to every direction it goes beyond that, the film stays in its proverbial lane and uses its media and its story platform to tell a compelling story within its mean.

There is not a single moment where you do not buy what is occurring on-screen when it comes to the way these sites and media function Aside from a few hiccups that I will get into later , and it truly shows an understanding of both the limits of this scope and of the media they used to tell this story.

Crazy as it sounds, it is an incredible accomplishment seen here by Chaganty that the film remained comprehensible, well-directed, and ended up as the first film of its genre to ever incorporate social media properly.

Speaking of which, it is a delight that we do not get any fake websites in this film. What I mean by this is, there is no "sub-in" for Youtube or Facebook or anything of that like.

It is both a treat to those who look for authenticity in this concept that not only did the crew know what they were talking about, but also to see that they trusted audience to expect realism and no substitute.

Fake social media sites in film is out, and incorporating the quite real social media sites around us is IN..

This could perhaps be enough for a downright experimental film to be considered serviceable, but what truly elevates this even further is John Cho's fantastic performance as a father at his wit's end fighting to find his daughter.

Though we only get small bursts of the clear talent and commitment he has for this role, by the time the film was over even his own mouse cursor and movements depicted by his searching through the internet had its own injected 'character' to it.

Despite how well the film is executed, a few flaws do hold it back from being a masterpiece by a first-time director.

The climax of the film and the conclusion we reach to the mystery itself is a bit fantastical and hard-to-buy for my tastes, though it hardly ruins the entire film structurally.

In addition, Michelle La as the daughter character is not especially good in the scenes she is featured in, which was perhaps why the only scenes I never felt entirely invested were the ones where she was front-and-center.

Considering this is her first feature film role, that's perhaps simply inexperience coming to the fore, but it still hurts the film when her scenes are sandwich between a fantastic performance by John Cho.

Along with these problems with story and performances, the minuscule details between the lines of the film's internet setting are a tad fuzzy.

Namely things regarding the service YouChat and how it is presented, along with the tiniest nitpicks in presentation like the mouse cursor moving so buttery-smoothly it became hard to buy.

In addition, my feelings toward the film having a background score are a tad mixed, though I grew to accept it as the film went on.

Simply a matter of tastes. All of that said, "Searching" is a quite masterfully done thriller with an execution that is truly a marvel to behold.

Never has this genre of found footage been able to crack the concept of painting a thrilling film through the scope of a computer screen until now.

With the internet seemingly 'cracked' by these writers and directors, however, this film ends up a first of its kind and quite the investing ride to take at the theatre.

I highly recommend you see this film and support something so indie and so unique. A story told entirely through a character's laptop screen - it's an increasingly popular gimmick that's now been done enough times that it can no longer be called fresh.

But, thankfully, this is best execution of the style to date. Aneesh Chaganty dazzles in his directorial debut, displaying a mastery of the medium, crafting a compelling film narrative told entirely through someone's laptop activity.

The movie comes out hot with a mostly nonverbal tale of love and family that's shades of 'Up' and nearly as affecting. An emotionally warping scene like that to kick things off lets us know immediately that we're in good hands.

The music choices give a strong signal of this as well. I firmly believe that music choices in the opening minutes of movies are as reliable an indicator of the movie's quality as you'll find.

This moving love story tells that us the family is close, or, at least they were before mom died. When Margot mysteriously goes missing, he finds out just how little he knows about his daughter.

He and police detective Rosemary Vick Debra Messing scramble to find out what happened to Margot - was she kidnapped, catfished, or did she runaway?

The work they put in to unravel this mystery is frantic and exhausting. They track Margot's car on traffic cams, they contact all of her Facebook friends, and they dig for anything of use they can find on her laptop.

The level of detail displayed in the investigation is so thorough that it's as much an education in snooping as it is entertainment not that parents should follow these steps to snoop on their own kids!

It's a constant thrill ride throughout, even as conventional storytelling techniques seep through the cracks at the end when the laptop screen gimmick proves too challenging.

One answered question leads to five more unanswered, and a few false endings and twists will leave you breathless. It's like riding a rollercoaster whose incline never ceased.

Your pulse is pounding and it's well worth the ending, which no one in my group figured out. The father daughter relationship felt so genuine.

The dad humor was on point, and when things got serious it felt real. It was like "Taken", but if it happened in real life.

Google search the hell out of your daughter's life to find her. Thanks to all the hype of crazy rich Asians, this film got buried by all that other movie's hype.

I believe this is what real representation is all about, when you have a role that doesn't need to be played by Asian but is played by Asian! Rating 8.

The seriousness of a father trying to find his missing Year-Old daughter with the help of a police eetective. This film will make you wonder what will happen for next plot.

Excellent acting performance by John Cho. The moral of the story is do not trust to anyone, if not will be disappointing you. Worth to watch!!

Amazing thriller- twists and turns. Just when you think the ending is too neat- there's another twist and another.

Had me crying in the first 5 minutes and sobbing at the end. Original and gripping. This film is gonna be huge! The word "gimmick" can be thrown around to describe a major element of a film that changes up the ordinary tropes we'd expect from a rather straightforward flick.

There is 3D, timeline splicing, animation, found footage, you name it. Some films almost even fall into these places as a genre.

When they do, you get the inkling that the people responsible for thinking up the movie likely have these elements in mind at the forefront with the story as an afterthought.

Only when that occurs do I call those elements gimmicky. And it's not that a gimmick is a bad thing, but if that is what you rely on to make your story compelling, it will often become a crutch for poor storytelling or one-and-done enjoyment.

Sometimes it is done right, in which case the gimmick works However, there is another breed of films where you can get that feeling that a story was thought up, and ultimately it was decided that the best way to tell that story was by use of something like 3D, etc.

When that happens, it is no longer a gimmick nor does it fall into that genre, so to speak. It is just the best way to tell that story, even though the story could work very well without it.

I am no longer attracted to the film because of the device being used, but rather I can almost ignore that it's happening because I am so engraved in the story being told.

Within the found footage narrative realm has come screencasting, where we see the world through somebody's computer or phone screen.

The first and only film of this variety I have seen was Unfriended, which takes place on one user's laptop screen as she does a group webcam chat.

This played off as a gimmick because it was the only way to tell the story. Searching is now the second screencasting film I have seen.

It has a bit of a hybrid feel though because there are jumps to other footage needed to tell the story perhaps from the news or something and there is also a score that the characters otherwise wouldn't hear.

Gimmick is also the last term I would use to describe what it does. The right audience will connect with this very well because they will feel very comfortable and familiar.

This is where the film gets to breathe and even provide what one could call comedic relief in just how real it all is to our technological experiences.

Director and co-writer Aneesh Chaganty came up with something extraordinary, and very smartly crafted this film into something where the main character's played by John Cho computer and phone are not devices no pun intended , but they are now characters.

There is an inaudible dialogue between him and screen, and the audience fills the gaps of what each of them are saying to each other.

I say the story could be told without the screencasting in play, but the audience would need another way of being exposed information through needless dialogue, either to oneself or other characters.

That, or we would still be looking at computer screens for a very long time, or time would have to be served filling scenes in other ways, so restructuring the screenplay would be required which is possible, but I think Chaganty found the best way to tell his story.

I am still on a high with this film, to the point where I temporarily feel comfortable saying this is my favorite film of the year so far. I think the first ten minutes of the film easily define what the entirety of the film will play out to be with regards to what emotions it will tap into you, and the opener of this film is one of my favorites in a long time.

Thinking back on it, it's probably what really seals what I really think about Searching as a whole, and puts your mind at ease for the screencasting style that Chaganty tells the story with.

This film is about a father whose high school daughter turns up missing, and he cooperates with the police in doing his own personal detective work through means of his electronic devices to help aid their investigation.

Thinking back at some of the missing persons films I have seen in my days Gone Girl, Prisoners, Taken, Man on Fire, Gone Baby Gone, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Flightplan, Ransom , these stories have ranged from: straightforward to conspiracy-laden, kidnappings to runaways, found alive to found deceased to never found at all I think that's what makes this movie work most, that by the end of the day you convince yourself that you felt you saw something extremely grounded and strangely relatable.

It's best that you try and not decide for yourself what kind of film or outcome you hope to see going into it, and instead commend the shrewd genius in weaving the pieces together in a very levelheaded manner.

Absolutely none of this works without the sturdy acting by John Cho. You clearly see the image of a wrecked and broken father attempting to find his daughter.

He has a compelling way of making us feel his his hurt and desperation. Chaganty once again used the screencasting element well here in having his character's on-screen actions say so much as well, from his mouse gestures to the things he starts to type but deletes before sending to other people, etc.

The audience will not have to work too hard with these facets because of competent directing and brilliant acting. What I suggest you do work really hard at while watching, however, is what I would call the Easter eggs this film has.

When a screen pops up with a bunch of e-mails, news articles, or chat conversations, you want to pick up everything that you can because you won't be able to pause and rewind in theater.

But furthermore and most importantly, every revelation of this film can be grasped if you work and look hard enough at everything that Cho's character works and looks at.

This is a good thing, and what makes it even better is this film is never predictable mostly because you know as much as the protag does, because you are literally seeing the film through his eyes.

He then discovers text messages between Margot and Peter, hinting that they might have had an incestuous relationship. When he confronts Peter, the latter explains that they were only smoking marijuana and confiding in each other.

He chastises David for failing to notice his daughter was depressed. Vick tells him that an ex-convict named Randy Cartoff confessed to raping and killing Margot before committing suicide.

An empty-casket funeral is arranged for Margot. He contacts the woman and discovers that she is a stock model who does not know Margot and that the police never called her.

Attempting to report this to Vick, he instead reaches a dispatcher who reveals that Vick volunteered to take the case and was not assigned to it as she had claimed.

He googles Vick and finds that she knew Cartoff through a volunteer program for ex-convicts. He reports this to the sheriff and Vick is arrested.

Margot sent Robert the money thinking he was a working-class girl whose mother was in the hospital. Robert felt guilty and wanted to give the money back.

When he surprised Margot by getting into her car while she was smoking, she ran, and in the scuffle, Robert accidentally pushed her off a cliff into a foot-deep ravine.

She then turned Cartoff into a fall guy and killed him. David asks Vick where Margot's body is, and she tells him that even if Margot had survived the fall, she could not have lived five days without water.

David tells the police to turn around, pointing out that the storm that occurred on the third day of the search would have provided Margot with water.

Sure enough, the rescue crew discovers Margot injured but alive. Two years later, Margot has applied for college to major in piano.

David tells her that Pamela would have been proud of her. The idea of the film was initially conceived as an 8-minute short film.

When Aneesh Chaganty and Sev Ohanian pitched the concept to The Bazelevs Company , they declined their offer to make it a short and instead gave them the offer to make it into a feature film.

While Ohanian was open to the offer and saw its potential, Chaganty was hesitant since he believed a feature film would be stretching the concept and feel too gimmicky.

But after coming up with the intro, they felt like the concept for the film would work. The film was shot over various devices. These include GoPro , Drone unmanned aerial vehicle , news helicopters, mini dv cameras , webcam , and even director Aneesh Chaganty's iPhone , which became the main camera.

The film had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on January 21, The website's critical consensus reads, " Searching ' s timely premise and original execution are further bolstered by well-rounded characters brought to life by a talented cast.

Variety ' s Peter Debruge called the film "so unique in its approach that Sundance can only program something of its kind once before the gimmick gets old.

Peter Travers of Rolling Stone gave the film four out of five stars and wrote "director Aneesh Chaganty, in an exceptional feature debut, does the impossible, building a high-voltage, white-knuckle thriller told almost exclusively through smartphones, laptop screens, browser windows and surveillance footage.

Searching is a technical marvel with a beating heart at its core, which makes all the difference". Cho take on a meaty lead role make Searching a satisfying psychological thriller.

Searching Film Deutsch Es Ist Schön Dass Es Dich Gibt Sohn Pamela Nam Kim. Sure enough, the rescue crew discovers Margot injured but alive. October 5, Full Review…. July 1, Full Review…. If 'Searching' does nothing else, it should raise awareness about the Charleen Deetz of social media, as well as the Für Immer Liebe Stream it can also help us in trying times. Like Sunday, März Spanisch Rain. Die gesamte Handlung des Films wird über Bildschirme gezeigt. Ordner werden angelegt, Fotos und Videos hochgeladen. Oftmals steckt in den nicht gesendeten Nachrichten viel mehr Ehrlichkeit als in denjenigen, die David letztlich abschickt. Ein Archivar soll eine Sammlung mysteriöser Videokassetten restaurieren. Lucy Stream Deutsch mit Searching.

Searching Film Deutsch Aktuell im Streaming:

Alle anzeigen. Internet Tv Free Chaganty. Torin Borrowdale. Dabei soll es sich inhaltlich um eine neue Geschichte handeln, die aber das Konzept aufgreift, die Handlung nur über Bildschirme zu zeigen. Der alleinerziehende Vater kommuniziert nun hauptsächlich online über Facetime Golden Globes Chat mit seiner jugendlichen Tochter, die gerne Klavier spielt. Ein Bergungsteam findet das Mädchen und zieht es lebend aus der Schlucht.

Searching Film Deutsch - Navigationsmenü

Courtesy of BH Tilt. Dein Kommentar.

Reviewer 19 August This film got it right in the technology department. All real websites, technology and actual examples of how you can search the internet to find information.

They had to get this right and as an avid tech enthusiastic i was pleased that they did. The storyline was well written, had twists and turns that i did not expect.

Decent movie! For all the people who ever tried And failed to make a compelling thriller about the internet, from "Unfriended" to "Megan Is Missing", I have news for you: Someone finally did it.

Instead, this film treats it as a platform to tell a compelling mystery story with an excellent performance by John Cho and a quite honestly revolutionary sense of direction at its center.

Whether it be social media, text logs or anything in-between, the film becomes a frantic search to find his missing daughter. The film itself is an odd hybrid of the Found Footage genre and of an actual narrative film.

What I mean by this is that we still see close ups, we still hear a musical score, and still see various camera tricks incorporated into the film, but our vantage point is limited only to a screen and what may appear on it.

Because of this, the direction expertly resorts to showing many forms of multi-media to paint a story that a feature film could tell.

From the film's wide-spanning opening Which is oddly reminiscent of Pixar's "Up" in more ways than one to every direction it goes beyond that, the film stays in its proverbial lane and uses its media and its story platform to tell a compelling story within its mean.

There is not a single moment where you do not buy what is occurring on-screen when it comes to the way these sites and media function Aside from a few hiccups that I will get into later , and it truly shows an understanding of both the limits of this scope and of the media they used to tell this story.

Crazy as it sounds, it is an incredible accomplishment seen here by Chaganty that the film remained comprehensible, well-directed, and ended up as the first film of its genre to ever incorporate social media properly.

Speaking of which, it is a delight that we do not get any fake websites in this film. What I mean by this is, there is no "sub-in" for Youtube or Facebook or anything of that like.

It is both a treat to those who look for authenticity in this concept that not only did the crew know what they were talking about, but also to see that they trusted audience to expect realism and no substitute.

Fake social media sites in film is out, and incorporating the quite real social media sites around us is IN..

This could perhaps be enough for a downright experimental film to be considered serviceable, but what truly elevates this even further is John Cho's fantastic performance as a father at his wit's end fighting to find his daughter.

Though we only get small bursts of the clear talent and commitment he has for this role, by the time the film was over even his own mouse cursor and movements depicted by his searching through the internet had its own injected 'character' to it.

Despite how well the film is executed, a few flaws do hold it back from being a masterpiece by a first-time director. The climax of the film and the conclusion we reach to the mystery itself is a bit fantastical and hard-to-buy for my tastes, though it hardly ruins the entire film structurally.

In addition, Michelle La as the daughter character is not especially good in the scenes she is featured in, which was perhaps why the only scenes I never felt entirely invested were the ones where she was front-and-center.

Considering this is her first feature film role, that's perhaps simply inexperience coming to the fore, but it still hurts the film when her scenes are sandwich between a fantastic performance by John Cho.

Along with these problems with story and performances, the minuscule details between the lines of the film's internet setting are a tad fuzzy.

Namely things regarding the service YouChat and how it is presented, along with the tiniest nitpicks in presentation like the mouse cursor moving so buttery-smoothly it became hard to buy.

In addition, my feelings toward the film having a background score are a tad mixed, though I grew to accept it as the film went on. Simply a matter of tastes.

All of that said, "Searching" is a quite masterfully done thriller with an execution that is truly a marvel to behold. Never has this genre of found footage been able to crack the concept of painting a thrilling film through the scope of a computer screen until now.

With the internet seemingly 'cracked' by these writers and directors, however, this film ends up a first of its kind and quite the investing ride to take at the theatre.

I highly recommend you see this film and support something so indie and so unique. A story told entirely through a character's laptop screen - it's an increasingly popular gimmick that's now been done enough times that it can no longer be called fresh.

But, thankfully, this is best execution of the style to date. Aneesh Chaganty dazzles in his directorial debut, displaying a mastery of the medium, crafting a compelling film narrative told entirely through someone's laptop activity.

The movie comes out hot with a mostly nonverbal tale of love and family that's shades of 'Up' and nearly as affecting. An emotionally warping scene like that to kick things off lets us know immediately that we're in good hands.

The music choices give a strong signal of this as well. I firmly believe that music choices in the opening minutes of movies are as reliable an indicator of the movie's quality as you'll find.

This moving love story tells that us the family is close, or, at least they were before mom died. When Margot mysteriously goes missing, he finds out just how little he knows about his daughter.

He and police detective Rosemary Vick Debra Messing scramble to find out what happened to Margot - was she kidnapped, catfished, or did she runaway?

The work they put in to unravel this mystery is frantic and exhausting. They track Margot's car on traffic cams, they contact all of her Facebook friends, and they dig for anything of use they can find on her laptop.

The level of detail displayed in the investigation is so thorough that it's as much an education in snooping as it is entertainment not that parents should follow these steps to snoop on their own kids!

It's a constant thrill ride throughout, even as conventional storytelling techniques seep through the cracks at the end when the laptop screen gimmick proves too challenging.

One answered question leads to five more unanswered, and a few false endings and twists will leave you breathless.

It's like riding a rollercoaster whose incline never ceased. Your pulse is pounding and it's well worth the ending, which no one in my group figured out.

The father daughter relationship felt so genuine. The dad humor was on point, and when things got serious it felt real.

It was like "Taken", but if it happened in real life. Google search the hell out of your daughter's life to find her.

Thanks to all the hype of crazy rich Asians, this film got buried by all that other movie's hype. I believe this is what real representation is all about, when you have a role that doesn't need to be played by Asian but is played by Asian!

Rating 8. The seriousness of a father trying to find his missing Year-Old daughter with the help of a police eetective. This film will make you wonder what will happen for next plot.

Excellent acting performance by John Cho. The moral of the story is do not trust to anyone, if not will be disappointing you. Worth to watch!!

Amazing thriller- twists and turns. Just when you think the ending is too neat- there's another twist and another. Had me crying in the first 5 minutes and sobbing at the end.

Original and gripping. This film is gonna be huge! The word "gimmick" can be thrown around to describe a major element of a film that changes up the ordinary tropes we'd expect from a rather straightforward flick.

There is 3D, timeline splicing, animation, found footage, you name it. Some films almost even fall into these places as a genre.

When they do, you get the inkling that the people responsible for thinking up the movie likely have these elements in mind at the forefront with the story as an afterthought.

Only when that occurs do I call those elements gimmicky. And it's not that a gimmick is a bad thing, but if that is what you rely on to make your story compelling, it will often become a crutch for poor storytelling or one-and-done enjoyment.

Sometimes it is done right, in which case the gimmick works However, there is another breed of films where you can get that feeling that a story was thought up, and ultimately it was decided that the best way to tell that story was by use of something like 3D, etc.

When that happens, it is no longer a gimmick nor does it fall into that genre, so to speak. It is just the best way to tell that story, even though the story could work very well without it.

I am no longer attracted to the film because of the device being used, but rather I can almost ignore that it's happening because I am so engraved in the story being told.

Within the found footage narrative realm has come screencasting, where we see the world through somebody's computer or phone screen.

The first and only film of this variety I have seen was Unfriended, which takes place on one user's laptop screen as she does a group webcam chat.

This played off as a gimmick because it was the only way to tell the story. Searching is now the second screencasting film I have seen.

It has a bit of a hybrid feel though because there are jumps to other footage needed to tell the story perhaps from the news or something and there is also a score that the characters otherwise wouldn't hear.

Gimmick is also the last term I would use to describe what it does. The right audience will connect with this very well because they will feel very comfortable and familiar.

This is where the film gets to breathe and even provide what one could call comedic relief in just how real it all is to our technological experiences.

Director and co-writer Aneesh Chaganty came up with something extraordinary, and very smartly crafted this film into something where the main character's played by John Cho computer and phone are not devices no pun intended , but they are now characters.

There is an inaudible dialogue between him and screen, and the audience fills the gaps of what each of them are saying to each other. I say the story could be told without the screencasting in play, but the audience would need another way of being exposed information through needless dialogue, either to oneself or other characters.

That, or we would still be looking at computer screens for a very long time, or time would have to be served filling scenes in other ways, so restructuring the screenplay would be required which is possible, but I think Chaganty found the best way to tell his story.

I am still on a high with this film, to the point where I temporarily feel comfortable saying this is my favorite film of the year so far.

I think the first ten minutes of the film easily define what the entirety of the film will play out to be with regards to what emotions it will tap into you, and the opener of this film is one of my favorites in a long time.

Thinking back on it, it's probably what really seals what I really think about Searching as a whole, and puts your mind at ease for the screencasting style that Chaganty tells the story with.

This film is about a father whose high school daughter turns up missing, and he cooperates with the police in doing his own personal detective work through means of his electronic devices to help aid their investigation.

Thinking back at some of the missing persons films I have seen in my days Gone Girl, Prisoners, Taken, Man on Fire, Gone Baby Gone, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Flightplan, Ransom , these stories have ranged from: straightforward to conspiracy-laden, kidnappings to runaways, found alive to found deceased to never found at all I think that's what makes this movie work most, that by the end of the day you convince yourself that you felt you saw something extremely grounded and strangely relatable.

It's best that you try and not decide for yourself what kind of film or outcome you hope to see going into it, and instead commend the shrewd genius in weaving the pieces together in a very levelheaded manner.

Absolutely none of this works without the sturdy acting by John Cho. You clearly see the image of a wrecked and broken father attempting to find his daughter.

He has a compelling way of making us feel his his hurt and desperation. The film had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on January 21, The website's critical consensus reads, " Searching ' s timely premise and original execution are further bolstered by well-rounded characters brought to life by a talented cast.

Variety ' s Peter Debruge called the film "so unique in its approach that Sundance can only program something of its kind once before the gimmick gets old.

Peter Travers of Rolling Stone gave the film four out of five stars and wrote "director Aneesh Chaganty, in an exceptional feature debut, does the impossible, building a high-voltage, white-knuckle thriller told almost exclusively through smartphones, laptop screens, browser windows and surveillance footage.

Searching is a technical marvel with a beating heart at its core, which makes all the difference". Cho take on a meaty lead role make Searching a satisfying psychological thriller.

Searching has created some sort of a blueprint to make more films like this more easily at a much faster pace. On August 14, , a sequel was announced to be in development.

Chaganty clarified that the story will not "follow the same characters or plot line as the original. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Searching Theatrical release poster. John Cho Debra Messing. Release date. Running time. British Board of Film Classification. Retrieved April 19, Box Office Mojo.

Retrieved January 20, Retrieved October 6, Retrieved July 29, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. Film School Rejects. November 28, Retrieved February 9, Sundance Film Festival.

November 29, Retrieved July 5, Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved July 18, Retrieved August 26, Sandra Hall. Searching is a taut, effectively paced mystery-thriller with a powerful emotional component.

James Berardinelli. As a drama about a father and a daughter relationship, Searching is nuanced and affecting. Geoffrey Macnab. Some nice moves but as shallow as YouTube celebrity.

David Jenkins. For most of its running time, Searching refreshes our screens. Smiley face. Charlotte O'Sullivan.

Searching is both an immersive and ingenious experience and because it is Aneesh Chaganty's directorial debut, one could only hope that he's got even more creative ideas on the horizon.

Matthew St. Searching is unlike any modern thriller I've seen, and actually knows how to do social media and the online world right, without being gimmicky.

Lucy Buglass. What places Searching a cut above the average thrillers filling the multiplex every weekend is the resonance of the relationship between David and Margot.

Scott Phillips. Centered on a solid performance from John Cho and sporting an appropriately silly sense of humor, this techno-thriller may not be high art, but it's a brisk, economical jaunt.

Matt Cipolla. This is a tremendous debut from Chaganty, Ohanian, and their team. They took the act of looking at a screen and turned it into a first rate thriller for the modern age.

Allen Almachar. The film can therefore said to have opened up a new dimension of filmmaking aesthetics; I just wish the other elements weren't so old-school.

CJ Sheu. Top Box Office. More Top Movies Trailers. Certified Fresh Picks. Black Mirror: Season 5. Into The Dark: Season 2.

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